Education for Sustainable Democracy

Guiding Productive Political Discussions, with Diana Hess (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

November 20, 2020
Education for Sustainable Democracy
Guiding Productive Political Discussions, with Diana Hess (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Chapters
Education for Sustainable Democracy
Guiding Productive Political Discussions, with Diana Hess (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Nov 20, 2020

What do students learn when they discuss controversial political issues? What are the benefits and limitations? How can teachers guide these discussions and maintain a positive classroom environment? In this episode, renowned social studies education scholar Diana Hess explores these questions, drawing on her two decades of research in classrooms. Hess is a professor and now dean at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education and has written two award-winning books about how young people can learn about and productively discuss controversial political issues. In this episode, she describes her major research findings and what they mean for teachers, and she also considers how educators should help students understand some challenging current issues, such as claims of widespread voter fraud and Donald Trump’s refusal to concede or facilitate a smooth presidential transition.

Resources Related to this Episode:

Article on Diana Hess

The Political Classroom, by Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy

Videos of Teaching Discussion Skills (by CERG)

Structured Academic Controversy Discussion Model

Brett's Article Featuring a Structured Academic Controversy

ESD Episode on Teaching the Capitol Riot

ESD Episode on Teaching Elections & Political Tolerance

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/esdpodcast)

Show Notes

What do students learn when they discuss controversial political issues? What are the benefits and limitations? How can teachers guide these discussions and maintain a positive classroom environment? In this episode, renowned social studies education scholar Diana Hess explores these questions, drawing on her two decades of research in classrooms. Hess is a professor and now dean at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education and has written two award-winning books about how young people can learn about and productively discuss controversial political issues. In this episode, she describes her major research findings and what they mean for teachers, and she also considers how educators should help students understand some challenging current issues, such as claims of widespread voter fraud and Donald Trump’s refusal to concede or facilitate a smooth presidential transition.

Resources Related to this Episode:

Article on Diana Hess

The Political Classroom, by Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy

Videos of Teaching Discussion Skills (by CERG)

Structured Academic Controversy Discussion Model

Brett's Article Featuring a Structured Academic Controversy

ESD Episode on Teaching the Capitol Riot

ESD Episode on Teaching Elections & Political Tolerance

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/esdpodcast)